Make EU trade with Brazil sustainable

More than 600 scientists in the EU and 300 Brazilian Indigenous groups have come together under the common goal of urging the EU to put human rights and the environment at the forefront of current trade negotiations with Brazil.

Their call came by an open letter published the 26th of April in Science on the initiative of Oxford University. Pierre-Cyril Renaud, leader of the CASEST project, is one of the signatories, supported by the University of Angers.


” I have engaged myself in this initiative because as a lecturer in ecology I find a large part of my sources of scientific and personal commitments in this letter “

Deforestation in the Amazon has accelerated since Brazilian president Bolsonaro scrapped environmental laws. Shutterstock
Deforestation in the Amazon has accelerated since Brazilian president Bolsonaro scrapped environmental laws. Shutterstock

This letter outlines the escalating risk of Indigenous rights violations and deforestation in Brazil. As Brazil’s second largest trading partner, it shows how the EU will be complicit in these crimes under current trade regulations. The signatories of the letter provide a path forward to make EU-Brazil trade truly sustainable – and hopefully push Brazil’s administration towards less extreme outcomes.

This letter outlines the escalating risk of Indigenous rights violations and deforestation in Brazil. As Brazil’s second largest trading partner, it shows how the EU will be complicit in these crimes under current trade regulations. The signatories of the letter provide a path forward to make EU-Brazil trade truly sustainable – and hopefully push Brazil’s administration towards less extreme outcomes.

Brazil’s people and the forests they protect are under attack. Violence along Brazil’s deforestation frontiers is reaching record levels, with at least three reported attacks and nine murders so far this month. Halting deforestation in Brazil is crucial to protecting human rights and global climate stability. However, international demand is a major driver of the land rush that is spurring violent attacks, putting Brazil’s forests, savannas, and people at ever increasing risk.


You may also like...

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Search OpenEdition Search

You will be redirected to OpenEdition Search